ENHANCEMENT OF PREOPERATIVE NEUROSURGICAL PLANNING, USING 3D SEGMENTATION MODELS

Authors

  • Alexandru Andrușca ”Diomid Gherman” Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Chișinău, Republic of Moldova https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6174-7114
  • Victor Andronachi ”Diomid Gherman” Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Chișinău, Republic of Moldova
  • Mihail Gavriliuc ”Diomid Gherman” Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Chișinău, Republic of Moldova
  • Olga Gavriliuc State University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Nicolae Testemiţanu”, Chișinău, Republic of Moldova
  • Pavel Gavriliuc State University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Nicolae Testemiţanu”, Chișinău, Republic of Moldova

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4069519

Keywords:

segmentation, 3D, printing, neurosurgery, reconstruction, neuroimaging

Abstract

Objectives. The vertiginous, progressive development of the contemporary imaging techniques, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, apparently led to an increase in the information volume, provided about anatomical structures and investigated pathological processes, but also, deficiencies in rendering information from the imager to the clinician didn’t improve and this is largely due to the fact that the information is still provided by 2D images. To utterly understand how things really are and to plan the surgery correctly, the surgeon relies on imagination, which largely depends on his own experience. To overcome these limitations, 3D technology can provide detailed information about the 3D orientation of normal anatomical structures, in relation to pathological ones. Our aim was to show the importance of 3D volume segmentation as a teaching and preoperative tool for neurosurgical interventions and to demonstrate our experience in clinical practice.
Material and Methods. We chose "Inobitec DICOM" software. Multiple objects were fused to form a final 3D scene of the patient-specific anatomy. The models were exported for subsequent editing in external programs such as "Meshmixer" and "Blender" and then on portable devices for viewing.
Results. We report a detailed methodology for picture acquisition, 3D reconstruction, and visualization with some surgical examples (clinical cases), treated in ”Diomid Gherman” Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Chișinău, Republic of Moldova. We, also, demonstrate how these navigable models can be used to build up composite images, derived by the fusion of 3D intraoperative images with neuroimaging-derived 3D models.
Conclusion. Our experience, in neurosurgery, has shown that this is an affordable technology with great opportunities. The models can be used for a variety of purposes (teaching, planning, 3D printing, and Virtual Reality). The creation of 3D models for planning is already used in several areas of neurosurgery.

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Published

2020-10-07

Issue

Section

ORIGINAL RESEARCHES

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